NFTs and blockchain key to metaverse future, crypto boosters claim

NFTs and blockchain key to metaverse future, crypto boosters claim

Blockchain technology, used to power cryptocurrencies and other decentralized record-keeping systems, has been struggling to find practical use cases outside ransomware and speculative projects like Bitcoin and NFTs. There have been a number of pilot projects in a variety of industries, but they’ve rarely turned into anything with significant business impact because of issues related to security, scalability, efficiency, and cost.

Now crypto proponents are looking to the metaverse as an area where the blockchain can make an impact.

NFT proponents say it is a better way of personalizing art and content in the metaverse, and say that the blockchain is a technology that can decentralize and secure metaverse content.

However, NfT’s actual use as part of the core infrastructure of the metaverse will likely be limited given those same issues of privacy, security, and inefficiency, plus the lack of legal oversight.

The most successful implementation of blockchain is cryptocurrencies, which are mainly used for speculative purposes. Like cryptocurrency, most people will be using NFTs in the metaverse for speculation, said Anndy Lian, a founding member of Influxo and Asia chairman of BigONE, a top global digital asset exchange.

And the fact that there’s a lack of legal oversight could actually be a benefit for its adoption, he said.

“Indeed, away from the hype about NFTs as high priced art work, one of their chief attractions within the crypto space is that they’re not considered securities for regulatory purposes,” he told Hypergrid Business.

There are privacy concerns regarding the blockchain. Although cryptography is involved in the sense that each transaction that’s added to the blockchain is digitally signed, the actual content of the blockchain is in plain text, unencrypted, available for anyone to read. That means that the public can, for example, trace cryptocurrency payments from wallet to wallet.

However, because of the legal limbo that crypto is currently in, there are no “know your customer” requirements such as those in place for all other types of financial activity.

For this reason, proponents of blockchain say it can prevent the kind of user privacy violations that Facebook — now rebranded as “Meta” — has been criticized for.

And since the blockchain relies on decentralized storage — every participant has their copy of the entire blockchain — there is no central control.

Through tokenization of physical assets for sale in the metaverse platforms, blockchain and NFTs can unlock commerce because this way, they facilitate exchanging of goods digitally, that could not be digitally transacted before, he said. For instance, digital passports such as those promoted by ARCx, can help with credit scoring, collateralized lending, and decentralized commerce in the metaverse, he said.

NFTs are already being used in existing metaverses such as Decentraland, but there are a lot of forgeries and duplication.

Blockchain can assure authenticity

According to proponents, the blockchain’s digital signature mechanism and distributed nature can help creators prove that they are the actual owners of particular content, and help users demonstrate that they are legitimate users.

Using blockchain could reduce NFT forgeries in the metaverse because each node verifies the status and ownership of all assets on the network, hence preventing them from being duplicated or changed, said Cynthia Cao, creator of CC is Dreaming, who is a NFT personality and a leading figure in virtual reality in entertainment.

And it’s not just about digital goods, she added.“In the future, when people upload their consciousness into the metaverse, we cannot ensure that their memories are not tampered with or controlled by anyone without the verification and authentication that blockchain provides,” she told Hypergrid Business. 

Storing metaverse content, data, NFTs, images and other arts on the blockchain can ensure permanent storage of that data as it becomes immutable.

This can prevent illegal tampering of anything of value stored in the metaverse, said Luke Stokes managing director at Foundation for Interwallet Operability.

The FIO protocol is enabling artists to sign their work with an easily readable address that acts as a unique signature for their work, hence preventing NFT forgeries, he told Hypergrid Business.

But there are risks, he added.

“There is also the potential for user error, where people miscopy long complicated addresses or suffer man-in-the-middle attacks that could potentially result in millions of dollars being sent to the wrong address or stolen forever,” he said.

Many existing metaverses and virtual worlds succeed by gamifying social and business experiences.

Metaverse platforms that use blockchain have better digital-based rewarding mechanisms for such gamification, for instance through tokens and in-world digital currencies, said Dinis Guarda, who is author, founder, and non-executive chairman of LynKeyCitiesabc.com, and Openbusinesscouncil.org.

“The metaverse will empower peer-to-peer experiences that will offer jobs, financial empowerment, lending, and trading, he said. “The metaverse and NFTs certification solutions will take on the role of a virtual business-empowered financial system.”

This gamification will lead to further growth of art, fashion, collectives, history, cities, property in the metaverse, he said.

Cryptocurrencies are also being used to trade goods and services, for gaming rewards, betting, and for value speculation in metaverses. In Decentraland, for instance, users can buy NFTs with cryptocurrencies or platform token MANA.

Other examples include Citiesabc.com, a metaverse for cities, and LynKey, a virtual and augmented reality platform using crypto for trading NFTs in property and smart tourism.

Unlike fiat currencies like the US dollar or the Euro, crypto enables very cheap transactions in digital worlds, said Daniel Logvin, CEO at LedgerByte.

“We can actually use blockchain to manage in-metaverse currency,” he told Hypergrid Business. “This provides us with security and transaction verification for our purchases and trades, thus ensuring a solid and transparent economy.”

There have even been grids that used Bitcoin in OpenSim, such as YrGrid back in 2015, though none of these projects ever took off due to the high management and overhead costs of using the volatile Bitcoin currency for in-world payments.

Although gaming and art will continue to lead in adoption of metaverse and NFTs, remote working and virtual living — which increased due to COVID, will play a role in popularizing metaverse, NFTs because even the non-tech world is getting interested.

“I think we are entering a really exciting time for the mainstream adoption of NFTs,” said Influxo’s Lian. “Certainly the rise of NFTs for football fans around the world to capture unique moments and to follow their favorite players is a testament to the maturing of the NFT marketplace.

The dark side of the blockchain

Turning an image or another digital asset into an NFT does not actually create any value, said Maria Korolov, editor and publisher at Hypergrid Business. Since it’s stored on the open blockchain, there is no security for assets. In fact, there’s already an epidemic of people simply “right-clicking” on NFTs to save their own copies, with no repercussions, since the block chain no legal weight behind it. Plus, anyone can add anything to a blockchain, whether or not they are the legal owners of that content.

NFTs are thus nothing more than virtual Beanie Babies, she said.

“NFTs by themselves don’t protect intellectual property,” she said. “Anyone can claim to own IP and put it on the blockchain. And the blockchain itself is notoriously susceptible to being hacked.”

Crypto companies are high-profile targets for attackers. Hackers go after exchanges, virtual wallets, and even the blockchain itself. For example, one approach is the “50 percent hack.” The blockchain is decentralized, and if there’s a conflict between transactions the blockchain automatically opts for the transaction that’s supported by the majority of the participants. Hackers have hijacked blockchains repeatedly by using botnets to create participating nodes and then stealing millions of dollars worth of currency. This vulnerability is built into the fundamental design of the blockchain, and there is currently no known fix.

Hackers steal money from blockchains right, left and center, she said.

Finally, blockchains are inefficient compared to centralized data storage because the data is duplicated in multiple locations, and new transactions require progressively larger amount of computing power, resulting in adverse environmental impact.

“That’s why no major organization has replaced its databases with blockchains,” she said. “Blockchains are inefficient, insecure, and basically unmanageable,” she said. “A bunch of companies have done pilot projects. They issued press releases about the pilot projects. But then when they looked at how those pilot projects actually worked out, they quietly abandoned the whole thing and never mentioned it again and wrote off the money they wasted as a learning experience.”

 

Original Source: https://www.hypergridbusiness.com/2022/01/why-nfts-and-blockchain-are-critical-to-success-of-metaverse/

Anndy Lian is an early blockchain adopter and experienced serial entrepreneur who is known for his work in the government sector. He is a best selling book author “Blockchain Revolution 2030”. Currently, he is appointed as Chairman, Asia for BigONE Exchange and Chief Digital Advisor, Mongolia Productivity Organisation. Anndy is part of the Gyeongsangbuk-do Blockchain Special Committee, Government of Republic Korea, together with industry experts such as Brock Pierce. Lian played a pivotal role as the Blockchain Advisor for Asian Productivity Organisation (APO), an intergovernmental organization committed to improving productivity in the Asia-Pacific region and was previously the Advisory Board Member of Hyundai DAC Technology.

An avid supporter of incubating start-ups, Anndy has also been a private investor for the past eight years. With a growth investment mindset, Anndy strategically demonstrates this in the companies he chooses to be involved with. He believes that what he is doing through blockchain technology currently will revolutionise and redefine traditional businesses. He also believes that the blockchain industry has to be “redecentralised”.

You can read more about Anndy’s work at www.anndy.com

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Crypto Fundraising in 2022: More VC, Metaverse, Gaming, and Regulatory Questions

Crypto Fundraising in 2022: More VC, Metaverse, Gaming, and Regulatory Questions
  • Established VC firms are now realizing that crypto is the next great wave of tech.
  • Investors will be focused largely on projects operating within the metaverse, Web 3, DeFi, NFT, and gaming sub-sectors.
  • Current metaverse-related projects need to improve the social aspect of their platforms before attracting the really big bucks.
  • One important question remains: does the increasing involvement of VC funds in crypto make it likelier that the SEC will tend to view cryptoassets as securities?

 

The nascent crypto industry is very dependent on funding. Not just the funding we’ve seen in the form of various coin offerings and private fundraising, but also the indirect funding that occurs whenever retail traders buy a cryptoasset and boost its price, thereby increasing the value of funds held by blockchain platforms and their developers.

The past few years have witnessed an evolution in crypto funding, however, with the initial coin offering (ICO) wave of 2017 and 2019 gradually giving way to more traditional venture capital (VC). And as the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) continues its legal battle with Ripple, it’s highly likely that this trend will only deepen in 2022.

According to industry figures speaking with Cryptonews.com, more traditional VC firms and investment funds will turn towards crypto and blockchain this year, further pushing public token offerings into the margins. And they’ll be focused largely on projects operating within the metaverseWeb 3, and gaming sub-sectors.

More VCs venture into crypto

2021 may have been a great year for crypto in terms of rising prices and market activity, but it was also a record-breaking year as far as more traditional venture capital funding was concerned.

Data compiled by PitchBook shows that, over the course of 2021, venture capital funds invested around USD 30bn in crypto- and blockchain-related firms. This is more than four times the previous record total set in 2018, and it’s also more than all other years combined.

This breakthrough amount has set a new precedent and created a new model for the industry, with the USD 30bn total also surpassing the record amount of money raised by ICOs in 2018 (which was between USD 11bn and USD 22bn, depending on who you ask). And given that the SEC is suing Ripple for allegedly conducting an unregistered securities offering, 2022 is likely to see more projects looking to VC funds for investment.

“Established VC firms are now realizing that crypto is the next great wave of tech, like the Internet itself and mobile beforehand. They must invest — they have no choice,” said Mark Jeffrey, General Partner at the Boolean Fund and Co-founder of Guardian Circle.

Jeffrey suggests that a VC firm missing out on the next Google or Amazon or Facebook would be catastrophic, not least when they already missed out on Ethereum (ETH)’s ICO, which will potentially prove to be one of the greatest investment opportunities in history.

“So 2022 will certainly see increased interest and investment at an accelerated pace,” he told Cryptonews.com.

Other figures and analysts working within the crypto sector agree that this year will bring an increase in traditional investment firms diving into crypto for the first time.

“Yes, we will see more traditional funds entering into the cryptoverse. Particularly I see that there will be more uptakes from family offices and sovereign wealth-related funds,” said Anndy Lian, the Chairman of the crypto exchange BigONE and the Chief Digital Advisor to the Mongolian Productivity Organization.

As a taster of the kind of entity we can expect to enter crypto fundraising this year, it’s worth remembering that none other than Japanese financial giant SoftBank invested in the Sandbox in early November. In fact, SoftBank also invested in Digital Currency Group around the same time, along with Alphabet (Google’s parent company) and the state-owned Singaporean fund GIC.

This is quite a wide range of different funding organizations, and it’s because a diverse pick of funds are getting involved in crypto that some analysts think, sooner or later, pretty much all major funds will have to be.

“In the mid-90’s, there were internet VCs. By 2000, virtually every VC was an internet VC. Crypto investing is on that same trajectory,” said Lou Kerner, the CEO of Blockchain Coinvestors Acq. Corp.

Targets: Metaverse, gaming, NFTs, Web 3, and DeFi

So assuming that more traditional investment funds and firms will get involved in raising money for crypto, what kinds of projects will they mostly be targeting?

“Metaverse is the hottest space at the moment, and that will likely extend through 2022 and beyond. But we’re still so early in crypto, that every area should see dramatic growth in investments, including gaming, layer 1 and layer 2 protocols, DeFi, and NFTs,” Kerner told Cryptonews.com.

The metaverse (whatever that will actually prove to be) is a theme mentioned by every commenter Cryptonews.com spoke with for the purposes of this article. This includes Mark Jeffrey, who despite suggesting that the metaverse will be the biggest target for funds in 2022, also argues that current metaverse-related projects need to improve the social aspect of their platforms before attracting the really big bucks.

“If you go into Decentraland, you see 500-1000 people — but none of them are talking to each other. They’re all wandering around, together, but alone, looking at scenery — and sure, buying land and avatar pieces — but that’s it,” he said.

Jeffrey predicts that such a model won’t sustain itself, unless it becomes more comprehensively social, with people able to spend hours interacting with each other online, as do on platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.

“But I do have hope that someone WILL crack the metaverse social medium, and one of these offerings will erupt. Once it does, NFT’s and crypto will create a massive opportunity for tens or hundreds of billions to be made,” he added.

Associated with the metaverse, gaming is likely to be another area that gets VC funds hot under the collar in 2022.

“The play-to-earn gaming sector also seems huge, as Axie Infinity has proven. Even though the gameplay is not great, it’s taken off in a big way,” said Jeffrey.

Another area that crops up, along with the metaverse, Web 3, gaming, and NFTs, is DeFi.

“The more specialized [funds] will go for specific verticals; if they are more into the finance sector, they will go for DeFi or investing in the next main chain if they are more tech-savvy,” predicted Anndy Lian.

The regulatory question

One important question remains: does the increasing involvement of VC funds in crypto make it likelier that the SEC will tend to view cryptoassets as securities? Because with funds buying the native tokens of platforms in the expectation that these platforms will grow (via the efforts of an enterprise) and, in turn, make said tokens more valuable, it really does seem as if the Howey test is being satisfied.

For Anndy Lian, this is a difficult question to answer, given that it depends on several variables.

“Personally, the increased number of investments into crypto does not necessarily mean that regulators will see the investments as securities. It depends on the nature of the project, where and how the VCs get them money from, and lastly where do they exercise their agreements,” he said.

For Mark Jeffrey, increased VC funding may incite the wrath of the SEC, although the latter is likely to come down hard on crypto anyway in 2022 and beyond.

“I do think the SEC will attack crypto in general and DeFi in particular in 2022. And [they] will have some success at curtailing activity in the US — but not worldwide,” he said, adding that crypto is growing too fast elsewhere in the world for American regulators to curb its growth too much.

Despite the fact that crypto can operate elsewhere than the US, the likely belligerence of the SEC and other American regulators may seem discouraging. However, Anndy Lian suggests the growing role of traditional VC funds may in fact soften the stance of the SEC and other regulators.

He said, “In fact, I would challenge that such an increase in investments would be good case studies and will act as a benchmarking tool for regulators to know how to further navigate in the crypto space, so as to find better solutions to protect the retail investors.”

 

 

Original Source: https://cryptonews.com/exclusives/crypto-fundraising-2022-more-vc-metaverse-gaming-regulatory-questions.htm

Anndy Lian is an early blockchain adopter and experienced serial entrepreneur who is known for his work in the government sector. He is a best selling book author “Blockchain Revolution 2030”. Currently, he is appointed as Chairman, Asia for BigONE Exchange and Chief Digital Advisor, Mongolia Productivity Organisation. Anndy is part of the Gyeongsangbuk-do Blockchain Special Committee, Government of Republic Korea, together with industry experts such as Brock Pierce. Lian played a pivotal role as the Blockchain Advisor for Asian Productivity Organisation (APO), an intergovernmental organization committed to improving productivity in the Asia-Pacific region and was previously the Advisory Board Member of Hyundai DAC Technology.

An avid supporter of incubating start-ups, Anndy has also been a private investor for the past eight years. With a growth investment mindset, Anndy strategically demonstrates this in the companies he chooses to be involved with. He believes that what he is doing through blockchain technology currently will revolutionise and redefine traditional businesses. He also believes that the blockchain industry has to be “redecentralised”.

You can read more about Anndy’s work at www.anndy.com

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The Edge Markets: Singapore’s wary crypto embrace leaves top mogul in the cold

The Edge Markets: Singapore’s wary crypto embrace leaves top mogul in the cold

(Jan 12): Binance Holdings Ltd Chief Executive Officer Changpeng Zhao was putting on a brave face.

An affiliate of the world’s largest cryptocurrency exchange had just withdrawn its application to run a bourse in Singapore. Zhao, the richest person in cryptocurrency with a fortune of about US$90 billion, took to Twitter to say the affiliate’s investment in another exchange — one that was regulated — made the application “somewhat redundant.”

As it turns out, the other exchange has a licence to trade some things — such as shares in private companies and tokenized assets — but not cryptocurrencies. More importantly, the real reason for the withdrawal was that Binance’s affiliate didn’t meet Singapore’s criteria for protecting against money laundering and terrorist financing, a person familiar with the matter said after it happened last month. Binance denies this, saying it pulled the application on strategic and commercial grounds.

“There is a very clear line drawn in the sand,” said Lena Ng, a partner at Clifford Chance who advises cryptocurrency players in Singapore and internationally.

The cryptocurrency industry is attracting the attention of regulators around the world, with US Securities and Exchange Commission Chair Gary Gensler labelling it the “Wild West” and saying it needs more oversight. The Singapore example shows the regulatory process won’t always be easy for the companies involved, even as states express openness to the concepts and technologies.

Ravi Menon, the managing director of the Monetary Authority of Singapore, the central bank and financial regulator, laid out Singapore’s approach in an interview with Bloomberg in October. The city-state sees promise in areas such as decentralisation, smart contracts and encryption, and wants to be well-positioned if they become integral to our economies, he said. But there are also “serious risks,” he said, giving the examples of money laundering and terrorist financing.

“It could lead to nowhere, or it could lead to a lot of risk and turmoil, or it could lead to a very good outcome for the economy and the society,” Menon said of the crypto phenomenon. “We have to look at it in terms of scenarios, and prepare ourselves for any of those outcomes.”

Singapore’s Payment Services Act came into effect in January 2020, providing a framework for regulating areas from trading Bitcoin to using tokens for payments. Under the law, MAS hands out so called digital payment token licences to crypto companies that make it through the application process.

The act’s introduction helped accelerate an inflow of crypto players into the Southeast Asian city.

Crypto.com, the world’s fourth-largest cryptocurrency bourse, relocated its headquarters from Hong Kong in 2021 and is seeking a licence. An affiliate of Huobi Group, which operated China’s biggest crypto exchange before last year’s blanket ban, is also applying, and its co-founder Du Jun has spent the last two years in Singapore. Binance’s Zhao, for that matter, had also been based in the city-state for the past two years.

All told, some 170 firms applied, including Coinbase Global Inc, the exchange that went public in the US last year in a landmark moment for the crypto industry. Gemini Trust, the bourse founded by Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss, is also among the applicants. Companies that have put in an application are allowed to operate in the city under a grace period until the regulator says otherwise or they drop out.

But about 100 applicants have already withdrawn or been rejected. Most failed to meet Singapore’s criteria for preventing illicit flows of funds, a person familiar with the matter has said.

In fact, only four are known to have received their licences, including Independent Reserve, an Australian cryptocurrency exchange, and the brokerage unit of DBS Group Holdings Ltd, Singapore’s largest bank. One other company, local startup Coinhako, said it had received in-principle approval.

“We don’t need 160 of them to set up shop here,” Menon said in the October interview. “Half of them can do so, but with very high standards.”

Singapore is taking a middle ground between the extremes of China, which banned all crypto transactions in September and vowed to stop illegal crypto mining, and El Salvador, which adopted Bitcoin as legal tender that same month.

It’s an approach that has similarities with other Asian financial centres.

Hong Kong, Singapore’s main rival as the region’s leading financial hub, uses a so-called “opt-in” regulatory regime for crypto exchanges, meaning they can apply to be regulated. It has approved one firm. The authorities are in the process of passing laws to enable a new licensing regime.

Japan had recognized 15 companies as cryptocurrency exchange operators as early as 2017, making it one of the pioneers of crypto regulation. As of December, it had given licences to 30 such firms.

South Korea had accepted registrations by 24 crypto-trading exchanges to operate in the country as of Dec 23. Only four of them are allowed to provide trading services in Korean won.

Singapore has advantages for becoming a crypto hub in its low-tax regime and lack of a levy on capital gains, according to Ulisse Dellorto, the Asia-Pacific head of blockchain analytics firm Chainalysis. The city-state also has an edge in ease of doing business, robust infrastructure and connectivity, and the fact that it’s already a financial center, said Gerald Goh, co-founder and Singapore CEO of Sygnum, which runs a digital-asset bank in Switzerland and an asset manager in the Asian city.

Some 350 firms focusing on blockchain and cryptocurrency already operate on the island, according to Chia Hock Lai, co-chairman of the Blockchain Association Singapore, which promotes blockchain technology. That translates into about 3,500 jobs, based on a median staff size of 10, he said.

But the case of Binance, which generated at least US$20 billion of revenue last year according to a Bloomberg analysis, suggests expanding at all costs isn’t necessarily the priority.

There were already signs the writing was on the wall for Zhao’s firm in September, when Singapore’s regulator added Binance.com, the group’s main platform, to its Investor Alert List of unregulated entities that may have been wrongly perceived as licensed or regulated by MAS. It told Binance Holdings to stop offering services regulated in the city-state, allowing only the Singapore entity to serve local residents.

Then in December, almost two years after it applied, Binance withdrew from the process.

“This certainly won’t damage Singapore’s reputation as a crypto hub,” said Neal Cross, a financial-technology entrepreneur and former chief innovation officer of the bank DBS. “In fairness, it may enhance it. Crypto is still nascent and has a long way to go before it becomes a major player in our wealth portfolios, but to make that happen, it needs to happen in a place that is firm but fair.”

A spokesperson for Binance said it’s continuing to work closely with partners and government agencies in Singapore to support the growth of blockchain and cryptocurrency initiatives in the country.

Cross said openness to crypto will yield benefits because blockchain and decentralised finance are likely to make up a large part of the financial services industry in the future. Asked about potential downsides, he said there are two.

“One is the failure of such exchanges” and “the losses incurred by mom and pop investors as these aren’t government-guaranteed”, he said. “Secondly, crypto is notoriously hard to track and hence can open up new pathways to money laundering, but I feel MAS are on top of this with their current regulation.”

MAS’s Menon has repeatedly said Singapore doesn’t want its people speculating on Bitcoin and other volatile cryptocurrencies.

“MAS frowns on cryptocurrencies or tokens as an investment asset for retail investors,” he said in a December speech. Cryptocurrency prices “are not anchored on any economic fundamentals and are subject to sharp speculative swings. Investors in these tokens are at risk of suffering significant losses.”

Bitcoin, the largest cryptocurrency, more than doubled from the start of 2021 through a high in November before tumbling for the rest of the year. In 2018, it plunged 74%. The digital token slid less than 0.1% on Wednesday to trade at US$42,649.75.

People chasing digital investment opportunities should exercise caution and participate “responsibly”, Minister for Communications and Information Josephine Teo said Jan 11.

Singapore’s desire to protect its public from crypto trading has echoes in its policy for its two casinos, which have been a big economic success but came with concerns its people would be affected by gambling. In response, the government charges a S$150 (US$111) daily entry fee for citizens and permanent residents, while foreigners get in for free.

To be sure, not everyone is positive about Singapore’s crypto strategy.

“When Binance left, it became a statement that Singapore doesn’t welcome the big boys,” said Anndy Lian, the chairman of cryptocurrency bourse BigONE Exchange. “Many people are going for Dubai, because they see Singapore as not welcoming, and don’t know the real reasons behind that.”

Binance itself has turned to the Middle East, signing a cooperation agreement with the Dubai World Trade Centre Authority last month on the emirate’s planned virtual asset ecosystem. It also got in-principle approval from Bahrain’s central bank to be a crypto-asset service provider in the kingdom. And it appointed Richard Teng, a high-profile hire who joined Binance’s Singapore affiliate as its CEO in August, as the global entity’s head of the Middle East and North Africa.

Meanwhile, back in Singapore, a billboard for Crypto.com shouted its message in bold at a busy crossing on the Orchard Road shopping belt. “Fortune favours the brave,” it declared.

That may be true, or it may also favour the cautious. For Huobi Singapore CEO Edward Chen, the key is to get the mix just right.

“It is important to find the right balance between regulation and mitigating risks while still maintaining a competitive edge,” Chen said.

 

Original Source: https://www.theedgemarkets.com/article/singapores-wary-crypto-embrace-leaves-top-mogul-cold

Anndy Lian is an early blockchain adopter and experienced serial entrepreneur who is known for his work in the government sector. He is a best selling book author “Blockchain Revolution 2030”. Currently, he is appointed as Chairman, Asia for BigONE Exchange and Chief Digital Advisor, Mongolia Productivity Organisation. Anndy is part of the Gyeongsangbuk-do Blockchain Special Committee, Government of Republic Korea, together with industry experts such as Brock Pierce. Lian played a pivotal role as the Blockchain Advisor for Asian Productivity Organisation (APO), an intergovernmental organization committed to improving productivity in the Asia-Pacific region and was previously the Advisory Board Member of Hyundai DAC Technology.

An avid supporter of incubating start-ups, Anndy has also been a private investor for the past eight years. With a growth investment mindset, Anndy strategically demonstrates this in the companies he chooses to be involved with. He believes that what he is doing through blockchain technology currently will revolutionise and redefine traditional businesses. He also believes that the blockchain industry has to be “redecentralised”.

You can read more about Anndy’s work at www.anndy.com

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