Where does Singapore’s crypto policy go from here?

Where does Singapore’s crypto policy go from here?

Singapore, the leading economy in Southeast Asia, has long been thought of as welcoming to innovation, particularly in the fintech sector as an engine for growth. With that embrace of innovation came a forward-looking embrace of all things cryptocurrency and blockchain, attracting startups from around the world, with Singapore ranked as the second most popular country for ICOs in 2018. This approach has contrasted with China, which has banned crypto trading and mining, and in the U.S., where the Securities and Exchange Commission sought to play enforcement catch-up, following the ICO boom.

It seemed to the outside world that up until recently, Singapore was leading the way on crypto. As reported last summer, while many parts of the world was hellbent on cracking down on crypto, “crypto players like Binance have found Singapore to be a paradise of opportunity, even while a regulation storm looms over the industry in other parts of the globe.” Even as recently as last October, after more crackdowns on crypto in China, the city-state of Singapore was seen as a chief beneficiary of fleeing businesses.

This liberal status quo persisted even as over 300 crypto companies waited for a license to operate in Singapore under the 2020 Payments Services Act (PS Act), following 2019 legislation from the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS). An optimistic 2020 report that the system of providing a temporary exemption from licensing under the new law amounted to “regulatory acceptance.” Which, coupled with Singapore’s robust reputation, ensured it’s “likely to make the country a haven for crypto exchanges and startups over the next few years.”

How off the mark has that prediction proven to be? Fast forward to the start of 2022, with only a handful of licenses awarded by MAS to a few well-resourced and well-connected concerns, coupled with the world’s most popular crypto exchange Binance withdrawing its application and shutting down its exchange operations in Singapore, one wonders: how has the crypto dream for Singapore proved so illusory?

To answer this rhetorical question, let’s go back to before 2020 when Singapore was a powerful magnet for crypto startups and businesses, starting in the ICO boom years from 2017 when the authorities classified crypto as digital commodities.

In March 2018, speaking at Money 20/20, Ravi Menon, the head of MAS, wryly accepted that “not all developers and programmers in the crypto world are anti-establishment anarchists” but expressed concerns about issues around the use of cryptocurrencies for criminal activity, how KYC and money-laundering (AML) regulations applied, and the use of crypto in ransomware attacks. Equally concerning to Menon and MAS is the perceived threat from the volatile nature of cryptocurrencies, and the risk this posed to retail investors. These concerns lie behind the legislation in 2019-20, bolstered further in January 2021 to ensure crypto regulation was aligned with the requirements of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF).

Clearly, what gave the impression of continuity with the liberal pre-PS Act approach was the fact that crypto companies were given a temporary license exemption. And what better way to illustrate this discrepancy between image and reality than an on-camera Bloomberg interview in November 2021 when Menon reiterated the policy aim to make Singapore a global center for crypto business, was based on “strong regulation” to avoid the multitude of risks involved.

“But not to get into this game, I think, risks Singapore being left behind. Getting early into that game means we can have a head start, and better understand its potential benefits as well as its risks,” Menon added for clarity. As the Bloomberg report observed, this forward-looking approach “can be a fine line to tread, given the crypto industry grew up with few regulations, so many players balk at government officials’ attempts to impose guardrails.”

From my perspective, Singapore’s aim has never been to grant all applicants a license, rather to use the process to implement a highly selective approach. “We don’t need 160 of them to set up shop here. Half of them can do so, but with very high standards, that I think is a better outcome,” Menon has said.

Singapore’s current approach is also at odds with the crypto startup spirit of transparency and flexibility. In contrast, under the current approach, MAS rarely if ever tells crypto applicants what is required to succeed. Thanks to the absence of objective criteria available to the public, this gives the impression that MAS favors the elite, with very little real transparency as to why these decisions are made. I’ve heard it argued that MAS should get a free pass as its job is to protect the public, and in that regard, MAS is not alone as a financial regulator in its opaqueness.

In a similar jam as crypto startups in Singapore, the U.K.’s crypto trade body, CryptoUK, wrote to the Chancellor at HM Treasury regarding the crypto asset industry last year. It encountered similar concerns about the pace of crypto regulation, the lack of feedback, and the risks this posed to the post-Brexit economy — all of which echo the situation crypto businesses currently face in Singapore.

So, while I recognize on a basic level that MAS as a regulator is “only doing its job” like the case of the U.K., the danger is the current application process will only benefit an elite handful of larger organizations that have the resources to sit and wait. With the result being, they leave for friendlier jurisdictions. Binance is already reportedly looking to move its corporate HQ to the United Arab Emirates, and when that deal is sealed, no doubt many crypto startups will be sorely tempted to follow suit and move, too.

My aim at the outset in writing this op-ed was to underline my belief in the long-term viability of Singapore’s crypto and blockchain ecosystem, based within a successful financial system that is the envy of Southeast Asia. I also welcome the latest guidelines from MAS designed to warn the public about the risks in trading and investing in cryptocurrency. These advertising guidelines are necessary, correct and forward-looking.

Finally, crypto trading can be dangerously addictive too. Singapore’s National Council on Problem Gambling (NPCG) should take the initiative to create a task force to cope with possible issues derived from crypto speculations or crypto betting. I appreciate this is no simple task, for example, the growth of crypto casinos operated from a decentralized network (DAO) can be a new problem, too, but I believe it is important to act promptly to safeguard the public and to get rid of the industry’s bad actors.

 

Original Source: https://forkast.news/where-does-singapores-crypto-policy-go-from-here/

Anndy Lian is an early blockchain adopter and experienced serial entrepreneur who is known for his work in the government sector. He is a best selling book author “Blockchain Revolution 2030”.

Currently, he is appointed as the Chief Digital Advisor at Mongolia Productivity Organization, championing national digitization. Prior to his current appointments, he was the Chairman of BigONE Exchange, a global top 30 ranked crypto spot exchange and was also the Advisory Board Member for Hyundai DAC, the blockchain arm of South Korea’s largest car manufacturer Hyundai Motor Group. Lian played a pivotal role as the Blockchain Advisor for Asian Productivity Organisation (APO), an intergovernmental organization committed to improving productivity in the Asia-Pacific region.

An avid supporter of incubating start-ups, Anndy has also been a private investor for the past eight years. With a growth investment mindset, Anndy strategically demonstrates this in the companies he chooses to be involved with. He believes that what he is doing through blockchain technology currently will revolutionise and redefine traditional businesses. He also believes that the blockchain industry has to be “redecentralised”.

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Shiba inu coin price prediction for 2030: How high will it go?

Shiba inu coin price prediction for 2030: How high will it go?

Shiba inu, a dog-themed meme currency created in August 2020 by the anonymous founder Ryoshi has soared recently, hitting an all-time high last month.

Named after the same breed of Japanese dog featured in dogecoin, shiba inu tagged itself as “the dogecoin killer” when it launched in 2020.

As an ERC-20 altcoin created on the Ethereum blockchain, shiba inu is rooted in community involvement and the project may serve to alter rigid traditional financial structures through the power of collective decentralisation.

According to its white paper, shiba inu is a community-run token led by 120,000 members who participate in spontaneous community building within an ecosystem that is run by its own decentralised exchange (DEX).

The SHIB crypto is the first token to be listed on ShibaSwap, a proprietary DEX which aims to provide an ecosystem where cryptocurrencies can be traded safely.

In May 2021, shiba inu famously sent half of its total supply – 50 trillion coins – to Ethereum creator Vitalik Buterin through his publicly available ETH address.

Buterin then burned 90% of the shiba inu tokens in his possession, which amounted to a total sum of $6bn, according to data from Ethereum, and donated the remaining coins to a Covid-19 relief fund in India.

This week crypto exchange Kraken listed shiba inu, which is now tradeable against the US dollar and the euro with a trading minimum of 50,000 shiba inu. The exchange noted a price precision of eight decimal places and a quantity precision of five decimal places.

At the start of this month, Kraken teased that it would list the SHIB coin if one of its posts on Twitter received 2,000 likes but the post ended up garnering over 80,000 likes.

What’s more, shiba inu entered into the top 10 biggest cryptocurrencies on 28 October 2021 as the eighth highest-ranking coin on CoinMarketCap, jumping ahead of dogecoin and polkadot, though it has since fallen back to 12th place.

SHIB price analysis: Technical view

On 9 May this year when Elon Musk criticised dogecoin, labelling it as a “hustle” during an appearance on Saturday Night Live, SHIB rallied to $0.00001842, hitting $0.00003208 on 11 May 2021.

The price then consolidated, trading within the $0.000006 to $0.000008 range until 7 October 2021, when it climbed to $0.00003112.

On 28 October this year, SHIB achieved the all-time high of $0.0000844, a rise of 173% over the preceding seven days. Only a week earlier, on 18 October 2021, SHIB had been trading at $0.00002829.

However, the price retreated to $0.00004459 on 4 November 2021, dropping to as low as $0.00003821 on 24 November – quite a sharp fall considering that the coin had hit its all-time high just 28 days earlier.

The price of SHIB has since climbed to $0.0000538 on 30 November 2021. This latest rebound activated a bull flag pattern when SHIB’s price broke above the flag’s upper trendline. This price rebound on 30 November 2021 could be attributed to SHIB being listed on Kraken that same day.

Based on a year-ago price of $0.000000000173 on 8 November 2020, SHIB is up more than 80,000,000% over the past year. On 30 November 2021, SHIB’s price climbed by more than 30% to $0.0000538, a surge that comes in the wake of broader price rebounds across other well-known crypto assets, though it fell back to $0.00004622 on 1 December.

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Technical analysis provided by CoinCodex shows that short-term sentiment on SHIB is bullish, with 20 indicators displaying bullish signals compared with five bearish.

The daily simple and exponential moving averages are giving strong buy signals, according to data from TradingView, while the relative strength index (RSI) is at 50.59 as of 1 December 2021.

An RSI reading of 70 or above indicates that a security is becoming overbought or overvalued and may be primed for a trend reversal or corrective pullback in price.

Catalysts for SHIB’s price

A number of catalysts have contributed to SHIB’s growth. Although Elon Musk has not publicly acknowledged the token, he sent a cryptic text-based image of a dog holding a rocket on 18 October this year which was interpreted as a reference to the “to the moon” symbol, which led to a 20% rise in shiba inu’s price.

In the same month, on 4 October, SHIB gained further traction after Musk posted a picture of his own shiba inu, Floki, on Twitter.

Earlier this year, Elon Musk criticised SHIB’s main rival dogecoin, labelling it as a “hustle” during an appearance on Saturday Night Live, which provided a boost to the SHIB coin.

Also, a recent petition listed on Change.org which urges the Robinhood trading platform to list SHIB has become one of the highest ranking petitions on the platform, garnering over a million signatures.

Finally, in July this year, ShibaSwap was launched, which has further helped liquidity by allowing hodlers to stake their coins.

Anndy Lian, the chairman of BigONE Exchange, and the chief digital advisor for Mongolia’s national productivity agenda, believes that shiba inu has made its mark on the cryptocurrency space.

“Shiba inu could soon surpass dogecoin. The key selling point is not just the price of the coin. I look at utility and community and shiba inu’s community is very strong,” Lian told capital.com.
“The cryptocurrency market is still growing and its hype is based on themes. In the mid 2021, it was all about utility but we have seen a shift to meme-themed cryptos, GameFi and the metaverse. I believe there will be another exit pump for meme coins in this bull-market run,” Lian added.
“Meme coins should be analysed collectively. If there are more credible meme coins in the space which are performing well in their respective fields, the whole meme market will grow, including SHIB. Good competition and rising stars like FLOKI, KISHU, ELON, AKITA and SAITAMA could further challenge the cryptosystem. Let’s unite to grow the space – not just the coin,” Lian concluded.

What are the risks affecting the Shiba coin outlook for 2030?

As an ERC-20 token created on the Ethereum blockchain, SHIB faces high transaction fees and proceeding delays that are common on the blockchain network. For example, the average fee on Ethereum is currently $46.12, according to data from BitInfoCharts.

Also SHIB lacks real-world utility since only 372 merchants worldwide are accepting it as a payment, according to Cryptwerk – a scarcity which affects the shiba inu forecast. This risk is only intensified by the fact that in the past month alone, more than 1,900 new cryptocurrencies were listed on CoinMarketCap.

According to Whale Stats, a crypto whale under the alias Gimli, recently bought 24.8bn SHIB tokens in a purchase worth around $1m, which prompts concerns about the high concentration of coins in few hands.

Shiba coin price prediction for 2030

In terms of a SHIB coin price prediction (2030), algorithm-based forecasting service Wallet Investor gives a positive SHIB/USD forecast. Based on historical data, Wallet Investor sees the price rising to $0.000089 by November 2022, $0.000189 in November 2024 and hitting $0.000289 by November 2026.

Digital Coin Price supports the bullish SHIB coin price prediction, expecting the token to grow to $0.0000872413 in 2022, $0.0001369933 in 2025 and hit $0.0002061220 in 2028.

For a longer-term shiba inu coin price target, Coin Price Forecast predicts that the SHIB price could reach $0.00085111 by the end of 2030, while Price Prediction sees it reaching a maximum possible level of $0.001 by 2030.

The senior editor at OKEx, Hunain Naseer told Capital.com:

“SHIB is up after about a month-long downward price action post its ATH at the end of October this year. This recent price surge comes at the back of news about a metaverse shiba inu game reportedly set to be developed by a triple-A game studio. While details about the studio haven’t been revealed yet, gaming industry veteran William Volk has also joined the project, giving it more credibility”.
“As plans for this game continue to materialise, we could see SHIB surge in price. However, the speculative nature of the coin and its massive price spike this year remains a risk factor to be considered by potential investors.”

Note that cryptocurrencies are highly volatile and predictions are very often wrong. Forecasts shouldn’t be used as a substitute for your own research. Remember that your decision should be based on your attitude to risk, your expertise in this market, the spread of your portfolio and how comfortable you feel about losing money. Never invest more than you can afford to lose and keep in mind that past performance is no guarantee of future returns.

 

Original Source: https://capital.com/shiba-inu-price-prediction-for-2030

How can I buy Shiba Inu token?

The simplest option is to buy Metamask to buy the token. When you click the buy button, you will be taken to a page with several options where you can purchase ether using your debit or credit card. When this is completed, you can swap ether (ETH) for shiba inu coin (SHIB) on ShibaSwap. Or you can head down to centralised exchanged such as Binance to buy it. Binance supports the deposit of more than 300 cryptocurrencies, several of which you can exchange for Shiba coin at some of the best rates in the market. You can directly purchase Shiba coin with credit card or debit card on Binance.

Who is Shiba Inu token?

Shiba Inu token (ticker: SHIB) is a decentralized cryptocurrency created in August 2020 by an anonymous person or group known as Ryoshi. It is a meme token which began as a fun currency and has now transformed into a decentralized ecosystem.

What is Anndy Lian's view on Shiba Inu token now?

Shiba inu could soon surpass dogecoin. The key selling point is not just the price of the coin. I look at utility and community and shiba inu’s community is very strong.

What is Anndy Lian's view on meme coins now?

The cryptocurrency market is still growing and its hype is based on themes. In the mid 2021, it was all about utility but we have seen a shift to meme-themed cryptos, GameFi and the metaverse. I believe there will be another exit pump for meme coins in this bull-market run. Meme coins should be analysed collectively. If there are more credible meme coins in the space which are performing well in their respective fields, the whole meme market will grow, including SHIB. Good competition and rising stars like FLOKI, KISHU, ELON, AKITA and SAITAMA could further challenge the cryptosystem. Let's unite to grow the space – not just the coin.

Anndy Lian is an early blockchain adopter and experienced serial entrepreneur who is known for his work in the government sector. He is a best selling book author “Blockchain Revolution 2030”.

Currently, he is appointed as the Chief Digital Advisor at Mongolia Productivity Organization, championing national digitization. Prior to his current appointments, he was the Chairman of BigONE Exchange, a global top 30 ranked crypto spot exchange and was also the Advisory Board Member for Hyundai DAC, the blockchain arm of South Korea’s largest car manufacturer Hyundai Motor Group. Lian played a pivotal role as the Blockchain Advisor for Asian Productivity Organisation (APO), an intergovernmental organization committed to improving productivity in the Asia-Pacific region.

An avid supporter of incubating start-ups, Anndy has also been a private investor for the past eight years. With a growth investment mindset, Anndy strategically demonstrates this in the companies he chooses to be involved with. He believes that what he is doing through blockchain technology currently will revolutionise and redefine traditional businesses. He also believes that the blockchain industry has to be “redecentralised”.

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Anndy Lian: The ‘Number Go Up’ Mentality is still the Driving Force now

Anndy Lian: The ‘Number Go Up’ Mentality is still the Driving Force now

Thanks, Crypto news for the mention. Let me add to what I have said in the article.

1. Is chasing big short-term gains more important for most crypto traders than investing in a crypto that actually has a good prospect of offering a meaningful product?

Of course, most traders are chasing big short-term gains. In the first place, the big gains got them into the crypto market. The hype, greed and prosperity drive them to stay on to “prey” for new tokens. Whether the product is meaningful or not is no longer important, most traders are looking at the short term value.

 

2. How much of the recent late-2020/early-2021 bull market was driven by ‘number go up’ traders? Was the bull market simply the result of a quest for big gains, or were at least some investors driven by the sense that crypto is getting closer to having a significant impact on the wider world?

2017 bull run is driven by retail investors. 2020 bull run is driven by the institutions, not the ‘number go up’ traders.

The ‘number go up’ traders came in when the prices were fairly high. 1% of the traders/ institutions contributed to 90% of the volume. This is how the market is like.

The new traders were especially happy when the price went up, and when the price went down a bit, their weak hands led them to sell off at losses. The billion liquidation headlines you see in the news are mainly contributed by that group of people. I have not heard of any institutions going burst.

 

3. Do you think this ‘number go up’ mentality is ultimately damaging to the crypto sector’s maturation and development in the long run? And is it something that crypto can get rid of as time passes?

I think ‘number go up’ traders contribute to the ecosystem and they are here to stay. Just like the stock market.

The group of people will go into a rotation mode. Those who have gone through the up and down. They will understand that the market is not about speculations. The ‘number go up’ group will move to look at the real value behind the coin or company. Then new ones will take over their role.

In terms of maturation and development in the long run, it will take time to reach that stage.
In bearish times, it is the best time to build technology and business. So the bear market is not so bad after all.

BTC went up, drew many here.
BTC went down, pushed many away.
This is a cycle.

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The ‘Number Go Up’ Mentality Drives Crypto World As It Matures

Is crypto all about ‘number go up’? Many of its detractors would certainly say so, while many proponents get overly excited about big price rises, betraying the possibility that they’re only in it for the money.

In either case, while skeptics argue that bigger numbers are the only things that drive cryptoassets traders and holders, others would affirm that many participants are driven by a vision of the future where governments and central banks have less power over economies and financial systems.

However, there are no numbers that would indicate how many crypto users are entering the Cryptoverse only because of a hope to make a quick buck. Especially, when it takes time and effort to understand this new complex world.

The driving force

Noted crypto author and skeptic David Gerard is firmly of the camp which holds that the number-go-up mentality is dominant within crypto.

“Long-term in crypto trading seems to be on the order of months, in the course of a bubble when all the numbers are going up. Long-term bitcoin holders might be an exception to this rule, or those who got in early with a popular coin such as ethereum or (to a certain extent) EOS,” he told Cryptonews.com.

For Gerard, few cryptoasset holders are actually investors who firmly believe that a project will make a meaningful contribution to the world. This is in part, according to him, because blockchain remains such an experimental and unproven technology, with relatively little demand from the wider world.

“The overwhelming majority of crypto projects fail. Even trying to pick winners here is largely professional gambling,” he added.

Even big players such as Barry Silbert, Founder and CEO of Digital Currency Group, said recently that he finds 99% of cryptoassets to be overpriced.

Also, certain people more sympathetic towards crypto agree that ‘number go up’ is pretty much the driving force of the market and industry now. This includes Anndy Lian, the Chief Digital Advisor at the Mongolian Productivity Organization, who says that most traders are doing what traders usually do – chase big short-term gains.

“In the first place, the big gains got them into the crypto market. The hype, greed, and prosperity drive them to stay on to ‘prey’ on new tokens. Whether the product is meaningful or not is no longer important, most traders are looking at the short term value,” he said.

However, the OKEx Insights team stresses that trading and investing (in the longer-term sense) exist side-by-side in crypto, as two different strategies.

“Oftentimes crypto traders have separate allocations for investing in projects and platforms that have promising potential. Ultimately, the choice between trading and investing depends on personal preference, goals and the broader market sentiment and condition,” said Hunain Naseer, Senior Editor at OKEx Insights.

Others take a more nuanced view, suggesting that even traders driven by short-term gains are looking to see whether a coin or project has good, fundamental reasons for going up. Analyst and author Glen Goodman is one of these, and he told Cryptonews.com that crypto has bigger problems than people looking for quick short-term gains.

“What isn’t good practice is becoming obsessed with one particular crypto and convincing yourself it’s going to conquer the world, even as the community loses interest, its price plummets for years and its network effects dwindle away,” he said.

Did ‘Number Go Up’ Drive the Recent Bull Market?

Assuming that the number-go-up mentality is dominant in crypto, you’d think that it’s largely responsible for the late-2020/early-2021 bull market we recently witnessed. However, depending on your general stance towards crypto, it wasn’t the initial cause.

For Robbie Liu, a Market Analyst at OKEx Insight, the primary instigator was the wider macroeconomic condition in which the world found itself, defined largely by “an overabundance of cash liquidity.”

“The economy was more depressed in the midst of the epidemic. Without enough consumer spending and a slowdown in business expansion, money can only go into risk assets to seek returns,” he told Cryptonews.com.

Such conditions resulted in institutions entering crypto in a way they hadn’t previously done.

“Another important factor is that institutional investors are gradually classifying Bitcoin in the alternative asset class since last year […] These entities have also been seeking diversification and bigger returns in this market,” Liu added.

Still, if quantitative easing, low interest rates and an excess of cash were the initial movers, short-term traders soon followed to add momentum to the bull market.

“More speculative trades were made by retail investors, betting on Bitcoin, tech, and growth stocks. I think some of these investors can go under ‘number go up’ traders,” Liu said.

However, Glen Goodman suggests that, in the context of large-scale money printing, concerns regarding inflation and the money supply were also a big driver, and not just pure short-termism.

“I think the recent bull market was driven by powerful narratives about the future, not just by traders looking for a quick buck. The pandemic ushered in a new era of money-printing by central banks, which stoked fears about the dilution of the dollar and inflation,” he said.

A necessary part of the maturation

Looking to the future, the number-go-up mentality might remain a fixture for a long time to come. For critics this is a bad thing, while others say it’s a necessary part of crypto’s maturation.

“This ‘number go up’ mentality does not exist in a vacuum and is continually reinforced as BTC continues to appreciate over the long term. However, this market dynamic is unlikely to last forever, especially as more participants, retail and institutional, enter the space,” said Hunain Naseer.

Likewise, Anndy Lian suggests that at least a portion of short-term traders will, over time, develop more of a longer term mentality, particularly as crypto begins to offer genuinely viable products and services.

“The group of people will go into a rotation mode. Those who have gone through the up and down. They will understand that the market is not about speculations. The ‘number go up’ group will move to look at the real value behind the coin or company. Then new ones will take over their role,” he said.

On the other hand, David Gerard claims that crypto will never really offer a meaningful product that has wider application or use, meaning that ‘number go up’ is here to stay.

“Number-go-up is intrinsic to the way crypto works; I’ve seen no sign of utility for crypto beyond this, or prospects for maturation,” he said. “DeFi is touted as solving some sort of problem that’s applicable to broader finance — I’ve even seen DeFi pumpers claim it’ll bank the unbanked, somehow — but is functionally just a shell game to the death played amongst the most committed crypto day traders.”

However, BTC users in the Bitcoin Beach in El Salvador might be of different opinion, as well as crypto payments processors such as BitPay and BTCPay that have processed billions in crypto payments, while DeFi users are also testing new ways to interact with a new, experimental financial infrastructure. Moreover, while some people in less stable countries are using cryptoassets to protect their capital, a recent international survey by Mastercard showed that 40% of the respondents are considering using crypto as a payment method.

Perhaps, if we look at both the price and adoption, possibly a more correct diagnosis would be that “numbers go up.”

 

Source: https://cryptonews.com/exclusives/the-number-go-up-mentality-drives-crypto-world-as-it-matures-10757.htm

Anndy Lian is an early blockchain adopter and experienced serial entrepreneur who is known for his work in the government sector. He is a best selling book author “Blockchain Revolution 2030”.

Currently, he is appointed as the Chief Digital Advisor at Mongolia Productivity Organization, championing national digitization. Prior to his current appointments, he was the Chairman of BigONE Exchange, a global top 30 ranked crypto spot exchange and was also the Advisory Board Member for Hyundai DAC, the blockchain arm of South Korea’s largest car manufacturer Hyundai Motor Group. Lian played a pivotal role as the Blockchain Advisor for Asian Productivity Organisation (APO), an intergovernmental organization committed to improving productivity in the Asia-Pacific region.

An avid supporter of incubating start-ups, Anndy has also been a private investor for the past eight years. With a growth investment mindset, Anndy strategically demonstrates this in the companies he chooses to be involved with. He believes that what he is doing through blockchain technology currently will revolutionise and redefine traditional businesses. He also believes that the blockchain industry has to be “redecentralised”.

j j j